March Month Coupon 5% off
   Forum Width:     Forum Type: 

 Posted: Feb 9, 2019 06:24AM
Total posts: 1812
Last post: Mar 22, 2019
Member since:May 1, 2007
Cars in Garage: 1
Photos: 220
WorkBench Posts: 0
US
I'll be honest, I don't remember, but it wasn't much. I think when I tried to fit the Miller tips and found that the chinese threads on the HF welder were different, I might have just re-threaded the tips to match. 

 Posted: Feb 9, 2019 02:00AM
Total posts: 7793
Last post: Mar 18, 2019
Member since:Feb 14, 2001
Cars in Garage: 0
Photos: 0
WorkBench Posts: 0
What did you do to modify to use miller tips?
Quote:
Originally Posted by RedRiley
I have one of the 120 Harbor Freight ones. The tips that come with it are crap, so I modified it slightly to use Miller tips. It works okay as long as you don't have more than a couple layers to weld through. I used it for a rear valance and it did pretty well. The 240 one would probably do a better job if you plan on using it a lot.
I've also got a spot welding tip for my MIG welder, and that works pretty good after some practice to get the heat just right depending on what you're welding on.


 Posted: Jan 13, 2019 12:26PM
Total posts: 2931
Last post: Mar 22, 2019
Member since:Apr 28, 2003
Cars in Garage: 5
Photos: 59
WorkBench Posts: 7
US
yup, Harbor Freight one, 220, but it is Heavy. Works good for what the $$$ i have into it.

 

 

My Email is : ronjern@sussextees.com   !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

 

 Posted: Jan 9, 2019 12:35PM
Total posts: 128
Last post: Feb 8, 2019
Member since:Aug 15, 2013
Cars in Garage: 0
Photos: 0
WorkBench Posts: 0
I used one of the 120V Harbor Freight units to replace a couple sheet metal parts and it worked incredibly well, once I got the hang of it. I've heard people suggest the 220, but I had no issues with the 120 and it runs on normal household power. The tips aren't great on the HF units (they can become distorted over time), but are replaceable. 

SO much easier than plug welding. Plugs work fine in areas a spot welder can't reach, but it's a lot more work and grinding plug welds doesn't look factory at all. 

Not sure where you're located, but if in Southern Calfornia I'd sell my used HF unit on the cheap, as I don't need it anymore at this point in my restoration. 

 Posted: Jan 9, 2019 09:42AM
Total posts: 355
Last post: Feb 26, 2019
Member since:Jul 20, 2013
Cars in Garage: 0
Photos: 0
WorkBench Posts: 0
I have the harbor freight 220V model. Works ok. You have to count the seconds on the trigger, if you go too long, it will burn a hole. Too short, it would hold. That is probably true of most spot welders. Keep the contacts filed sharp and clean and it works. Better, find someone who owns one and borrow it!

Jerry

 Posted: Jan 7, 2019 10:08AM
Total posts: 1438
Last post: Mar 14, 2019
Member since:Sep 8, 2003
Cars in Garage: 1
Photos: 186
WorkBench Posts: 0
CA
I have a Miller 240V handheld, my only complaint is that it weighs a ton! Seriously though, I will never go back to drilling/filling in places where the spot welder will reach. It literally takes less than 2 minutes to spot weld a sill panel to the door step.

Sean Windrum

1996 MGF VVC
1970 1275 GT Racer
66 Austin Countryman
63 997 Cooper (Under Construction)
63 MG 1100

 

 Posted: Jan 7, 2019 08:23AM
Total posts: 9874
Last post: Mar 18, 2019
Member since:Mar 24, 1999
Cars in Garage: 0
Photos: 0
WorkBench Posts: 0
GB
I used a Harbour Freight one extensively on Deans Countryman (while Dolly was still my project) and it worked fine.  Obviously not trade capacity and not automatic, but more than acceptable.

 Posted: Jan 7, 2019 05:12AM
Total posts: 1812
Last post: Mar 22, 2019
Member since:May 1, 2007
Cars in Garage: 1
Photos: 220
WorkBench Posts: 0
US
I have one of the 120 Harbor Freight ones. The tips that come with it are crap, so I modified it slightly to use Miller tips. It works okay as long as you don't have more than a couple layers to weld through. I used it for a rear valance and it did pretty well. The 240 one would probably do a better job if you plan on using it a lot.
I've also got a spot welding tip for my MIG welder, and that works pretty good after some practice to get the heat just right depending on what you're welding on.

 Posted: Jan 6, 2019 02:39PM
Total posts: 1458
Last post: Mar 19, 2019
Member since:Jun 18, 1999
Cars in Garage: 0
Photos: 0
WorkBench Posts: 0
I've seen a couple of used units on eBay. 240v is the preferred choice.  I'm hole punching and grinding.

 Posted: Jan 6, 2019 09:01AM
Total posts: 8866
Last post: Mar 20, 2019
Member since:Jun 5, 2000
Cars in Garage: 0
Photos: 0
WorkBench Posts: 0
US
Like you, I have plug welded to make spots. 

Over the years I have read several reviews of the Harbor Freight spot welders.  In general what I remember is that people say the 120V one is weak and the 240V one is OK.  I don't remember anyone listing a source for different shaped arms so you may be stuck with the simple pincers that come with the welder.  I have not seen reviews of other brands of spot welders.

Doug L.
 Posted: Jan 6, 2019 07:00AM
Total posts: 7793
Last post: Mar 18, 2019
Member since:Feb 14, 2001
Cars in Garage: 0
Photos: 0
WorkBench Posts: 0
Has anyone used one of the hand help spot welders? In the past I have used a mig to do spot welds but it would be nice to not have to grind all the spots to smooth out.