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 Posted: Dec 2, 2019 10:46PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mini-1380
So I decided to post to this old thread. My Mini has sat for quite a while. The brakes had all locked up. So I replaced the Brake drums, Shoes, Slave cylinders, Rotors, Disc pads and rebuilt the calipers. Then worked on the fueling. Replaced the fuel tank, cleaned the fuel pump, the carburetor, replaced the fuel filter and several fuel lines. Then got the car started. No oil pressure. So after reading this thread, I disconnected the oil cooler, primed the line in the block, rolled the car backwards about a foot. Filled and rolled again. filled and rolled a third time. Started the car up and had oil pressure in about 3 seconds. Yeah! Thanks guys. Still have a few more minor things to do/replace but it is back on the road again.
Always nice to hear a success story. Thanks for sharing.

 Posted: Dec 2, 2019 04:28PM
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So I decided to post to this old thread.

My Mini has sat for quite a while. The brakes had all locked up. So I replaced the Brake drums, Shoes, Slave cylinders, Rotors, Disc pads and rebuilt the calipers. Then worked on the fueling. Replaced the fuel tank, cleaned the fuel pump, the carburetor, replaced the fuel filter and several fuel lines. Then got the car started. No oil pressure. So after reading this thread, I disconnected the oil cooler, primed the line in the block, rolled the car backwards about a foot. Filled and rolled again. filled and rolled a third time. Started the car up and had oil pressure in about 3 seconds. Yeah! Thanks guys.

Still have a few more minor things to do/replace but it is back on the road again.

 Posted: Sep 10, 2013 08:56PM
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If parked too long (years) the oil drains out of the pump and the dry rotors won't self-prime. And there is then air in the pump outlet.

I just had this same problem with a Fiat 500 (1967) I'm working on, it was parked for 25 years and the oil pump was dry as a bone. After cleaning the pan and pickup, cranking gave no joy so I had to remove the timing case (with pump) and prime the gears with STP so it would prime.

Kevin G

1360 power- Morris 1300 auto block, S crank & rods, Russell Engineering RE282 sprint cam, over 125HP at crank, 86.6HP at the wheels @7000+.

 Posted: Sep 10, 2013 03:32PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by h_lankford

someone please interpret for me


was the airlock/bubble/whatever actually in the oil gallery/pump/system 

or was it just in the oil pressure sensor?

I believe that the oil slowly drained down out of the pump and oil pickup tube into toil pan, and therefore the dry pump couldn't bring oil up from the pan.  I don't know why the oil pressure hole pressurized when I injected oil into it, but this seemed to help prime it - or maybe it was just coincidence!

 

"I drive a Mini. What are you compensating for?"

 

 Posted: Sep 10, 2013 02:47PM
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someone please interpret for me


was the airlock/bubble/whatever actually in the oil gallery/pump/system 

or was it just in the oil pressure sensor?

 Posted: Sep 10, 2013 05:14AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mur

Years ago, when mini mania's media presence was stuff they printed themselves and mailed out, they sent a diagram of the oil galleries out.

It is handy to find and have a look at how the oil courses through a mini block.  If you are masochistic you can probably find an automatic oiling schematic too.

For the most part, here is a verbal description:

The oil sits down in the gearbox.

The pump has to suck oil up the oil pickup pipe to the back of the gearbox.  The oil still has to travel up and into the block and up the back of the block and then over and into the oil pump.  The oil pump then pushes the oil out the other side and towards the front of the block.  It either goes out the front of the block to the filter, sometimes via an oil cooler if you are into those things; or it can go past the oil pressure relief valve if it is open, as when the engine is started cold.

Oil that passes the oil pressure relief valve goes down back to the sump via the first veritcal gallery there.  There is another gallery behind it, which then connects to it, so any oil that passes the valve can escape as well.

Oil going to the filter is filtered, or bypassed if the filter is plugged, and then it continues into the block.  There is a gallery across the front of the block, with lines to each main bearing.  Oil can continue from the front main bearing area to the forward cam bearing and then up through the cylinder head and to the rockers.

Oil going to the center main can also continue to the center cam bearing.

No oil goes to the back cam bearing from the oil galleries, as oil escaping from the oil pump lubricates that bearing.

All three main bearings send oil through the crank to the rod bearings.  On very early minis with wet cranks, oil is fed to the primary gear and to the clutch plate.  On some cars there is a slight delay of a week or so before the oil gets to the clutch plate.

So, to bring oil pressure up on an engine that hasn't run in a long time, do exactly as Kevin, Spank and others have said.  Once the oil pump and the intake gallery, transmission gallery and oil pickup pipe are filled with oil, the engine will quickly build pressure.

Too funny............

If in doubt, flat out. Colin Mc Rae MBE 1968-2007.

Give a car more power and it goes faster on the straights,
make a car lighter and it's faster everywhere. Colin Chapman.

 Posted: Sep 9, 2013 09:06PM
mur
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Years ago, when mini mania's media presence was stuff they printed themselves and mailed out, they sent a diagram of the oil galleries out.

It is handy to find and have a look at how the oil courses through a mini block.  If you are masochistic you can probably find an automatic oiling schematic too.

For the most part, here is a verbal description:

The oil sits down in the gearbox.

The pump has to suck oil up the oil pickup pipe to the back of the gearbox.  The oil still has to travel up and into the block and up the back of the block and then over and into the oil pump.  The oil pump then pushes the oil out the other side and towards the front of the block.  It either goes out the front of the block to the filter, sometimes via an oil cooler if you are into those things; or it can go past the oil pressure relief valve if it is open, as when the engine is started cold.

Oil that passes the oil pressure relief valve goes down back to the sump via the first veritcal gallery there.  There is another gallery behind it, which then connects to it, so any oil that passes the valve can escape as well.

Oil going to the filter is filtered, or bypassed if the filter is plugged, and then it continues into the block.  There is a gallery across the front of the block, with lines to each main bearing.  Oil can continue from the front main bearing area to the forward cam bearing and then up through the cylinder head and to the rockers.

Oil going to the center main can also continue to the center cam bearing.

No oil goes to the back cam bearing from the oil galleries, as oil escaping from the oil pump lubricates that bearing.

All three main bearings send oil through the crank to the rod bearings.  On very early minis with wet cranks, oil is fed to the primary gear and to the clutch plate.  On some cars there is a slight delay of a week or so before the oil gets to the clutch plate.

So, to bring oil pressure up on an engine that hasn't run in a long time, do exactly as Kevin, Spank and others have said.  Once the oil pump and the intake gallery, transmission gallery and oil pickup pipe are filled with oil, the engine will quickly build pressure.

 Posted: Sep 9, 2013 08:45PM
 Edited:  Sep 9, 2013 08:45PM
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You need to crank with that hose fitting well loose until oil flows out, not just burps what you put in. Otherwise you can get an air lock in there.

I always crank with plugs out if it's been standing many months and I need to prime it.

 [edit] typo

Kevin G

1360 power- Morris 1300 auto block, S crank & rods, Russell Engineering RE282 sprint cam, over 125HP at crank, 86.6HP at the wheels @7000+.

 Posted: Sep 9, 2013 08:21PM
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Thanks all.  Kevin, I followed your instructions and had oil coming out of the oil cooler hose at the block fitting, tightened that up, removed the gauge line and cranked for a few more bursts.  Nothing.  Then cranked a few more and nothing.  Then I injected 6cc of oil with a syringe into the pressure gauge port on the block, which pressurized and oil shot out when I removed the syringe.  I got the line screwed on before losing more than 1.5ml or so, cranked it a few more times and pressure started rising.  Replaced plugs/ wires and fired it up, and back up to 75psi.

It was a little scary thinking of all of those dry crank overs with no oil pressure, but that happens to a small extent on every cold start-up, though most of the time oil doesn't have a year to drain back down to the pan.  I hope no damage was done.  

 

 

"I drive a Mini. What are you compensating for?"

 

 Posted: Sep 8, 2013 07:45PM
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I reverse prime it a couple of turns (topping up as said) with the relief valve fitted, then refit the banjo or hose. No need to remove the filter, just leave the banjo bolt (or hose connection onto the block) loose a couple of turns. Crank until oil flows out there, tighten it, crank again until it comes out the oil gauge hole. Good to go...

Kevin G

1360 power- Morris 1300 auto block, S crank & rods, Russell Engineering RE282 sprint cam, over 125HP at crank, 86.6HP at the wheels @7000+.

 Posted: Sep 8, 2013 07:26PM
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Yes, I pulled out the oil pressure relief spring (I have a 9/16" steel ball, not plunger behind the spring).  The ball was seated.  I also dumped a bunch of oil into the pressure relief hole, but not sure that goes where I would want it to.

I will crack the oil filter seal, make sure that is full (didn't do that initially), and give that a try.

I did not feed in oil while reverse priming (pushing the car backwards in 4th), which I will do!

I'll let you know how the above steps work out.

Thanks 

 

"I drive a Mini. What are you compensating for?"

 

 Posted: Sep 8, 2013 06:29PM
mur
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Is the oil pressure releif valve stuck slightly open?  Remove the cap, determine that the valve is fully home, and repeat the priming/reverse rotation.  

 Posted: Sep 8, 2013 06:28PM
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When "reverse priming," did you feed fresh oil into the block while pushing it backwards? I like to take a cheap plastic funnel and thread it into the block and then top it off with oil, then push backwards or turn engine over by hand.

Then you may want to put that banjo fitting back in (or your oil cooler line as it sounds like you have an oil cooler) and make sure all of that is connected up, but THEN unspin your oil filter so it oil runs down the side (and you know the seal is broken) and then spin over the engine until oil comes out of that filter head. Once you KNOW oil is coming to your filter head, then tighten up your filter and spin it over again.

I've had numerous times a "lock" perhaps caused by air or I don't know what that prevented the car from building oil pressure at startup (new engine or refurbished engine or sitting years). I typically have a full oil filter but air between the filter and the oil pump so it can't get oil up or something. Cracking the filter works.

Oh, and for grins check your bypass plunger isn't stuck open.

 Posted: Sep 8, 2013 05:43PM
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CA


You may have to do the back up in 4th a few times...be patient.

 Posted: Sep 8, 2013 04:36PM
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Is your filter full of oil?

Regards

Towjoe             Cool

 Posted: Sep 8, 2013 03:34PM
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It's been a while since I posted anything on the forum because the Mini has been in storage for almost a year.  

I went to start it up today for the first time with plugs out to build oil pressure, and there was nothing.  Then I poured oil into the oil cooler hose fitting in the block until it filled up (slowly draining back down), and still no oil pressure. I filled it again and again, using about 1/4 of a quart and still nothing.  I removed the oil pressure gauge copper line from the block and confirmed nothing was coming out while cranking.  Finally, I tried reverse priming by putting the car in 4th gear and pushing backwards several times for about 10 feet each time.  Still nothing.

Any ideas?  

When I put it away, it had oil pressure.

It's a 1275 Cooper S block.

Thanks,

Craig

 

"I drive a Mini. What are you compensating for?"